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Chinese state mouthpiece links ‘superstitious’ religious practices to string of Communist Party corruption scandals

12 October 2017 No Comment

Report in South China Morning Post, Oct 12, 2017
China’s state mouthpiece warned Communist Party officials on Thursday not to “pray to God or worship Buddha” because communism is about atheism and superstition is at the root of many corrupt officials who fall from grace.

China officially guarantees freedom of religion for major belief systems like Christianity, Buddhism and Islam, but party members are meant to be atheists and are especially banned from taking part in what China calls superstitious practices like visiting soothsayers.

The party’s official People’s Daily said in a commentary it had not been uncommon over the past few years to see officials taken down for corruption to have also taken part in “feudalistic superstitious activities”.

“In fact, some officials often go to monasteries, pray to God and worship Buddha,” it said. “Some officials are obsessed with rubbing shoulders with masters, fraternising with them as brothers and becoming their lackeys and their money trees.”

Chinese people, especially the country’s leaders, have a long tradition of putting their faith in soothsaying and geomancy, looking for answers in times of doubt, need and chaos.

The practice has grown more risky amid a sweeping crackdown on deep-seated corruption launched by President Xi Jinping upon assuming power in late 2012, in which dozens of senior officials have been imprisoned.

People’s Daily pointed to the example of Li Chuncheng, a former deputy party chief in Sichuan who was jailed for 13 years in 2015 for bribery and abuse of power, who it said was an enthusiastic user of the traditional Chinese geomancy practice of feng shui.

Another much more junior official, in the eastern province of Jiangxi, wore charms to ward off bad luck, it said.

“As an official, if you spend all your time fixating on crooked ways, sooner or later you’ll come to grief,” it said.

Mao Zedong banned fortune telling and superstition after the 1949 revolution, but the occult has made a comeback since the still officially atheist country embraced economic reforms and began opening up in the late 1970s.

In one of the most famous recent cases, China’s powerful former security chief Zhou Yongkang was jailed for life in part due to accusations he leaked undisclosed state secrets to a fortune-teller and healer called Cao Yongzheng, known as the “Xinjiang sage” after the far western region where he grew up.

People’s Daily said officials must remember Marx’s guiding words that “Communism begins from the outset with atheism”.

“Superstition is thought pollution and spiritual anaesthesia that cannot be underestimated and must be thoroughly purged,” it said.http://www.scmp.com/news/china/policies-politics/article/2115006/chinese-state-mouthpiece-links-superstitious-religious

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